Short and Sharp Git and GitHub Workflow

To know a thing is to do it!

Git is a powerful, sophisticated system for distributed version control. Gaining an understanding of its features opens to developers a new and liberating approach to source code management. Learn IT!

If you are coding student, or self start learner, this guide will help in your first steps for tracking your projects and breathing with GIT!   

Here, I assume that you have already:

1.) set up a GitHub account;
and

2.) installed Git on your computer.


Git and GitHub Workflow:

New Repository and Initial Commit

Each software project needs its own local Git repository and matching remote (online) GitHub repository.
1. Log in to your GitHub account at
https://github.com. In the upper right corner of the page, click the plus sign and choose ‘Create New Repository.’ Enter a
new repository name and click Create Repository. This step creates your
remote (online) GitHub repository for the project.

2. Using a command-line terminal on your computer, navigate to the software
project directory (folder) where you want to use Git.

3. Initialize a new local Git repository by typing ‘git init’.
4. Create a README file by typing ‘echo “# repo-name” >> README.md’ where
repo-name is the name of your remote (online) GitHub repository. You can
add more information to this file later using a text editor of your choice.

5. Create a .gitignore file by typing ‘touch .gitignore’.

6. Open the .gitignore file with a text editor of your choice and edit its contents to
make sure you list all files in the project directory that you do NOT want to
upload to your remote (online) GitHub repository. List one file on each line,
then save and close the .gitignore file.
Tip: You can use wildcards such as asterisks to match multiple files, so if you
want to ignore everything in a particular sub-directory, type ‘ToIgnore/*’
and Git will ignore all files in the folder called ToIgnore.

7. Add all project files to your local Git repository by typing ‘git add –all’.
Tip: This command will ignore all files listed in the .gitignore file.


8. Make your initial commit in the local Git repository by typing ‘git commit -m
“Initial commit”’.

9. Link your online GitHub repository to your local Git repository by typing

‘git remote add origin https://github.com/username/repo-name’ where username
is your GitHub username and repo-name is your remote (online) GitHub
repository name.


10.You may be prompted to enter your GitHub username and password. If so,
enter this information.

11.Push files from your local Git repository to your remote GitHub repository by
typing ‘git push -u origin master’. If you are prompted to enter your GitHub
username and password, enter this information.

Commits to an Existing Repository

These steps will work only if you already have initialized Git and GitHub
repositories for your specific software project. Each software project needs its
own local Git repository and matching remote (online) GitHub repository.

1. Using a command-line terminal, navigate to your software project directory.


2. Type ‘git status’. You will see any modified files listed in the terminal.


3. If only one file has been modified (changed), type ‘git add filename’ to add it
to your local Git repository. OR:
If multiple files have been changed, type ‘git add –all’ to add them to your
local Git repository.

4. Type ‘git commit -m “Commit message”’ to record the change in your project
history. The commit message should be short and descriptive. Examples
include “Fix bug in createList method” or “Add a deleteList method”.

5. Push your changes from your local Git repository to the corresponding remote
(online) GitHub repository by typing ‘git push -u origin master’.

6. Check the status by typing ‘git status’. You should see a message that says,
“On branch master. Your branch is up-to-date with ‘origin/master’. Nothing to
commit, working directory clean”.

After you done above you can go on my github project “Learn GIT in 3 STEPS” where you can find more visual guides and world best reference. Don’t forget to give me a star there 🙂 and send me pull request to improve it.

Thanks,

Kemal C.

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